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Evolutionary Developmental Biology (Rivera)

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    14426
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    The fields of Development and Evolution cannot be truly separated. When we study Developmental Biology we are mostly looking at a fine-tuned mechanical and genetic process that has been selected on for eons. Not only can evolution select on the final product - a working, fertile adult - but also can act at each developmental stage. It is easy to see how evolution acts through natural selection on adults, but how can it act on development itself?

    Thumbnail: "Views of a Fetus in the Womb", Leonardo da Vinci, ca. 1510-1512. The subject of prenatal development is a major subset of developmental biology.


    This page titled Evolutionary Developmental Biology (Rivera) is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Ajna Rivera.