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6: Appendix III- Using the Nanodrop

  • Page ID
    79495
    • Nathan Reyna, Ruth Plymale, & Kristen Johnson
    • Ouachita Babtist University & University of New Hampshire

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    How to Use the NanoDrop

     

    Watch the YouTube videos regarding questions for the NanoDrop.

    (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y3ICiycWeCA&t)

    The NanoDrop allows you to measure the concentration of DNA, RNA, and protein in a couple of microliters of the solution. It is best to use 1.5\(\mu L\) to 2\(\mu L\) for accurate measurements. Some models have the ability to measure fluorescently labeled molecules.

    Procedure:

    1. Open the NanoDrop software on the computer by double-clicking the “ND-1000” icon that looks a bit like an hourglass
    2. Shut down and close the NanoDrop computer.

    More information on what these NanoDrop values mean:

    https://tools.thermofisher.com/content/sfs/brochures/T123-NanoDrop-Lite-Interpretation-of-Nucleic-Acid-260-280-Ratios.pdf


    This page titled 6: Appendix III- Using the Nanodrop is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Nathan Reyna, Ruth Plymale, & Kristen Johnson.

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