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Biology LibreTexts

7: Cell Reproduction

  • Page ID
    22483
  • This chapter introduces two types of cell divisions. First it explains mitosis and then meiosis. This chapter also explains why cells divide and how the divisions are regulated. The errors in division may lead to diseases, such as leukemia.

    • 7.1: Case Study: Genetic Similarities and Differences
      Steve asked his doctor about Pharmocogenomics. The doctor explains to Steve that Pharmacogenomics is the tailoring of drug treatments to people’s genetic makeup, a form of ‘personalized medicine’.
    • 7.2: Cell Cycle and Cell Division
      This baby girl has a lot of growing to do before she's as big as her mom.
    • 7.3: Mitotic Phase - Mitosis and Cytokinesis
      Can you guess what this colorful image represents? It shows a eukaryotic cell during the process of cell division.
    • 7.4: Mutations and Cancer
      Your cells may grow and divide without performing their necessary functions, or without fully replicating their DNA, or without copying their organelles. Probably not much good could come of that. So the cell cycle needs to be highly regulated and tightly controlled. And it is.
    • 7.5: Sexual Reproduction: Meiosis and gametogenesis
      This self-portrait of an 18th century artist and his family clearly illustrates an important point.
    • 7.6: Genetic Variation
      Genetic variation. It is this variation that is the essence of evolution. Without genetic differences among individuals, "survival of the fittest" would not be likely. Either all survive, or all perish.
    • 7.7: Mitosis vs. Meiosis and disorders
      Both mitosis and meiosis result in eukaryotic cells dividing. So what is the difference between mitosis and meiosis? The primary difference is the differing goals of each process. The goal of mitosis is to produce two daughter cells that are genetically identical to the parent cell, meaning the new cells have exactly the same DNA as the parent cell. Mitosis happens when you want to grow, for example. You want all your new cells to have the same DNA as the previous cells.
    • 7.8: Case Study Genes Conclusion and Chapter Summary
      Humans are much more genetically similar to each other than they are different.

    Thumbnail: Image of the mitotic spindle in a human cell showing microtubules in green, chromosomes (DNA) in blue, and kinetochores in red. Image used with permission (Public Domain; Afunguy).