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Biology LibreTexts

5: Cells

  • Page ID
    22460
  • This chapter outlines the discovery of cells and cell theory. It identifies ways in which all cells are alike and ways in which they vary. The chapter describes in detail important cell structures and their functions; and it explains how cells obtain energy, grow, and divide.

    • 5.1: Case Study - The Importance of Cells
      We all get tired sometimes, especially if we have been doing a lot of physical activity like these hikers. But for Jasmin, a 34 year old former high school track star who is now a recreational runner, her tiredness was going far beyond what she thought should be normal for someone who is generally in good physical shape.
    • 5.2: Discovery of Cells and Cell Theory
      What is this incredible object? Would it surprise you to learn that it is a human cell? The cell is actually too small to see with the unaided eye.
    • 5.3: Variation in Cells
      This colorful image shows a bacterial cell (colored green) attacking human red blood cells.
    • 5.4: Plasma Membrane
      This simple, cut-away model of an animal cell shows that a cell resembles a plastic bag full of Jell-O.
    • 5.5: Cytoplasm and Cytoskeleton
      Figure 1 may look like a colorful work of abstract art or maybe an ultra-modern carpet design, but it's neither. It is actually a model of the interior of a cell. It's an artist's representation of what you might see if you could take a peek inside one of these basic building blocks of living things.
    • 5.6: Cell Organelles
      This image represents an important structure in living cells. It is a component of a ribosome, the cell structure where proteins are synthesized.
    • 5.7: Active Transport and Homeostasis
      You can tell by their faces that these airmen are expending a lot of energy trying to push this Humvee up a slope.
    • 5.8: Cellular Respiration
      This inviting camp fire can be used for both heat and light. Heat and light are two forms of energy that are released when a fuel like wood is burned. The cells of living things also get energy by "burning." They "burn" glucose in the process called cellular respiration.
    • 5.9: Anaerobic Respiration
      The muscles of this sprinter will need a lot of energy to complete her short race because she will be running at top speed.
    • 5.10: Case Study Tired Conclusion and Chapter Summary
      Jasmin discovered that that her extreme fatigue, muscle pain, vision problems, and vomiting were due to problems in her mitochondria, like the damaged mitochondria shown in red in the picture above. Mitochondria are small membrane-bound organelles found in eukaryotic cells that provide energy for the cells of the body.
    • 5.11: Cell Transport
      Look at the big windows and glass doors in this house. Imagine all the light they must let in on a sunny day.