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14: Genetic Modification

  • Page ID
    24864
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    • 14.1: Introduction
      Genetic modification of organisms has been occurring through human manipulation since the beginning of agriculture. Humans selectively bred crops and livestock to propagate desirable traits in a process termed artificial selection. The original grass that gave rise to domesticated corn called teosinte hardly resembles what we think of when imagining modern maize.
    • 14.2: GMO Food (Activity)
      This page contains instructions on how to perform a PCR detection of GM food. Briefly, genomic DNA will be isolated from food items derived from vegetation. Genetic modification will then be identified by PCR of the plant promoter used in genetic engineering, CaMV 35S. As a positive control for the appropriate extraction of DNA, PCR for plant-specific tubulin will be used.


    This page titled 14: Genetic Modification is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Bio-OER.

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