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16.3: Membranes, Surface Features, and Layers

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    Our exploration of more in-depth heart structures begins by examining the membrane that surrounds the heart, the prominent surface features of the heart, and the layers that form the wall of the heart. Each of these components plays its own unique role in terms of function.

    Membranes

    The membrane that directly surrounds the heart and defines the pericardial cavity is called the pericardium or pericardial sac. It also surrounds the “roots” of the major vessels, or the areas of closest proximity to the heart. The pericardium, which literally translates as “around the heart,” consists of two distinct sublayers: the sturdy outer fibrous pericardium and the inner serous pericardium. The fibrous pericardium is made of tough, dense connective tissue that protects the heart and maintains its position in the thorax. The more delicate serous pericardium consists of two layers: the parietal pericardium, which is fused to the fibrous pericardium, and an inner visceral pericardium, or epicardium, which is fused to the heart and is part of the heart wall. The pericardial cavity, filled with lubricating serous fluid, lies between the epicardium and the pericardium

    In most organs within the body, visceral serous membranes such as the epicardium are microscopic. However, in the case of the heart, it is not a microscopic layer but rather a macroscopic layer, consisting of a simple squamous epithelium called a mesothelium, reinforced with loose, irregular, or areolar connective tissue that attaches to the pericardium. This mesothelium secretes the lubricating serous fluid that fills the pericardial cavity and reduces friction as the heart contracts. Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\) illustrates the pericardial membrane and the layers of the heart.

    This image shows a magnified view of the structure of the heart wall.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): Pericardial Membranes and Layers of the Heart Wall The pericardial membrane that surrounds the heart consists of three layers and the pericardial cavity. The heart wall also consists of three layers. The pericardial membrane and the heart wall share the epicardium. (CC-BY-4.0, OpenStax, Human Anatomy)

    Surface Features of the Heart

    Inside the pericardium, the surface features of the heart are visible, including the four chambers. There is a superficial leaf-like extension of the atria near the superior surface of the heart, one on each side, called an auricle—a name that means “ear like”—because its shape resembles the external ear of a human (Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\)). Auricles are relatively thin-walled structures that can fill with blood and empty into the atria or upper chambers of the heart. You may also hear them referred to as atrial appendages. Also prominent is a series of fat-filled grooves, each of which is known as a sulcus (plural = sulci), along the superior surfaces of the heart. Major coronary blood vessels are located in these sulci. The deep coronary sulcus is located between the atria and ventricles. Located between the left and right ventricles are two additional sulci that are not as deep as the coronary sulcus. The anterior interventricular sulcus is visible on the anterior surface of the heart, whereas the posterior interventricular sulcus is visible on the posterior surface of the heart. Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\)illustrates anterior and posterior views of the surface of the heart.

    The top panel shows the anterior view of the heart and the bottom panel shows the posterior view of the human heart. In both panels, the main parts of the heart are labeled.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\): External Anatomy of the Heart Inside the pericardium, the surface features of the heart are visible (CC-BY-4.0, OpenStax, Human Anatomy)


    This page titled 16.3: Membranes, Surface Features, and Layers is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by OpenStax.

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