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11.1: The Cerebrum

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    The iconic gray mantle of the human brain, which appears to make up most of the mass of the brain, is the cerebrum (Figure 11.1). The wrinkled portion is the cerebral cortex, and the rest of the structure is beneath that outer covering. There is a large separation between the two sides of the cerebrum called the longitudinal fissure. It separates the cerebrum into two distinct halves, a right and left cerebral hemisphere. Deep within the cerebrum, the white matter of the corpus callosum provides the major pathway for communication between the two hemispheres of the cerebral cortex.

     

    This figure shows the lateral view on the left panel and anterior view on the right panel of the brain. The major parts including the cerebrum are labeled.


    Figure \(\PageIndex{1}\): The cerebrum is a large component of the CNS in humans, and the most obvious aspect of it is the folded surface called the cerebral cortex. (CC-BY-4.0, OpenStax, Human Anatomy)

     

    Cerebral Cortex

    The cerebrum is covered by a continuous layer of gray matter that wraps around either side of the forebrain—the cerebral cortex. This thin, extensive region of wrinkled gray matter is responsible for the higher functions of the nervous system. A gyrus (plural = gyri) is the ridge of one of those wrinkles, and a sulcus (plural = sulci) is the groove between two gyri. The pattern of these folds of tissue indicates specific regions of the cerebral cortex.

    The head is limited by the size of the birth canal, and the brain must fit inside the cranial cavity of the skull. Extensive folding in the cerebral cortex enables more gray matter to fit into this limited space. If the gray matter of the cortex were peeled off of the cerebrum and laid out flat, its surface area would be roughly equal to one square meter.

    The folding of the cortex maximizes the amount of gray matter in the cranial cavity. During embryonic development, as the telencephalon expands within the skull, the brain goes through a regular course of growth that results in everyone’s brain having a similar pattern of folds. The surface of the brain can be mapped on the basis of the locations of large gyri and sulci. Using these landmarks, the cortex can be separated into four major regions, or lobes (Figure 11.2). The lateral sulcus that separates the temporal lobe from the other regions is one such landmark. Superior to the lateral sulcus are the parietal lobe and frontal lobe, which are separated from each other by the central sulcus. The posterior region of the cortex is the occipital lobe, which has no obvious anatomical border between it and the parietal or temporal lobes on the lateral surface of the brain. From the medial surface, an obvious landmark separating the parietal and occipital lobes is called the parieto- occipital sulcus.

    The fact that there is no obvious anatomical border between these lobes is consistent with the functions of these regions being interrelated.

     

     

    This figure shows the lateral view of the brain and the major lobes are labeled.

    Figure \(\PageIndex{2}\): Lobes of the Cerebral Cortex The cerebral cortex is divided into four lobes. Extensive folding increases the surface area available for cerebral functions. (CC-BY-4.0, OpenStax, Human Anatomy)

     


    This page titled 11.1: The Cerebrum is shared under a CC BY license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by OpenStax.

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