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Biology LibreTexts

9: Gene Regulation

  • Page ID
    16148
  • To define a gene, a stretch of DNA must have a promoter, a start site, and and a stop site. In a prokaryote, these are necessary and often sufficient, but in a eukaryote, they are still necessary, but seldom sufficient. This chapter discusses the other elements, both positive and negative, that are used to regulate the expression (i.e. transcription) of a gene. It is primarily a story of transcription factors and the recognition elements to which they bind.

    • 9.1: Prokaryotic Transcriptional Regulation
      To define a gene, a stretch of DNA must have a promoter, a start site, and and a stop site. In a prokaryote, these are necessary and often sufficient, but in a eukaryote, they are still necessary, but seldom sufficient. This chapter discusses the other elements, both positive and negative, that are used to regulate the expression (i.e. transcription) of a gene. It is primarily a story of transcription factors and the recognition elements to which they bind.
    • 9.2: Eukaryotic Transcriptional Regulation
      As with almost every comparison with prokaryotic systems, regulation of eukaryotic transcription is much more complex than prokaryotic gene control, although still based on similar mechanisms of activators and repressors. There is no close eukaryotic equivalent to operons, though: eukaryotic genes are always transcribed one per mRNA.