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3: How Plants Grow, Part 1

  • Page ID
    93152
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    Learning objectives
    • Identify the unique features that distinguish shoots, leaves, and roots.
    • Describe ways in which stolons and rhizomes are modified stems.
    • Identify the types and parts of the major shoots, leaves, and roots.

    The organization of the plant is not unlike that of our own bodies. At the simplest level, cells are organized into tissues; these form organs that make up the plant body. At each level of this organization are specializations for the specific functions that occur during the plant’s life cycle. In this chapter, you’ll explore the structures and functions of leaves, shoots, and roots.

    Thumbnail: Each part of a plant — from tiny root hairs to the concealed buds — contributes uniquely to the overall growth of the plant. Pixabay. Pixabay license


    This page titled 3: How Plants Grow, Part 1 is shared under a CC BY-NC 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Tom Michaels, Matt Clark, Emily Hoover, Laura Irish, Alan Smith, and Emily Tepe (Minnesota Libraries Publishing Project) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.