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5: Cellular Respiration

  • Page ID
    24762
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    • 5.1: Introduction
      Energy is stored in the bonds of the carbohydrates. Breaking these bonds releases that energy. Crushing sugar crystals creates tiny electrical fields that give off invisible ultraviolet light. The wintergreen chemical (methyl salicylate) gets excited by these excited electrons and fluoresces in a visible blue wavelength. This phenomenon is called triboluminescence.
    • 5.2: Fermentation
      Yeasts are single-celled fungi. The species called Saccharomyces cerevisiae is commonly called Baker’s or Brewer’s yeast. Like other eukaryotes with mitochondria, yeast can use oxygen to generate ATP in the process of oxidative phosphorylation. These yeast are facultative aerobes which means they can also switch to an anaerobic mechanism of ATP production called fermentation.
    • 5.3: Cell Respiration (Concept)
      This page contains a concept map regarding cellular respiration.


    This page titled 5: Cellular Respiration is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Bio-OER.

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