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Biology LibreTexts

23: Appendix C - Human Anatomy

  • Page ID
    23740
    • 23.1: Anatomy and Normal Microbiota of the Skin and Eyes
      Human skin consists of two main layers, the epidermis and dermis, which are situated on top of the hypodermis, a layer of connective tissue. The skin is an effective physical barrier against microbial invasion. The skin’s relatively dry environment and normal microbiota discourage colonization by transient microbes. The skin’s normal microbiota varies from one region of the body to another. The conjunctiva of the eye is a frequent site for microbial infection and deeper infections are less commo
    • 23.2: Anatomy and Normal Microbiota of the Respiratory Tract
    • 23.3: Anatomy and Normal Microbiota of the Urogenital Tract
      The urinary system is responsible for filtering the blood, excreting wastes, and helping to regulate electrolyte and water balance. The urinary system includes the kidneys, ureters, urinary bladder, and urethra; the bladder and urethra are the most common sites of infection. Common sites of infection in the male reproductive system include the urethra, as well as the testes, prostateand epididymis. The commons sites of infection in females are the vulva, vagina, cervix, and fallopian tubes.
    • 23.4: Anatomy and Normal Microbiota of the Digestive System
      The human digestive system, or the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, begins with the mouth and ends with the anus. The parts of the mouth include the teeth, the gums, the tongue, the oral vestibule (the space between the gums, lips, and teeth), and the oral cavity proper (the space behind the teeth and gums). Other parts of the GI tract are the pharynx, esophagus, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, rectum, and anus.
    • 23.5: Viral Infections of the Circulatory and Lymphatic Systems
      Viral pathogens of the circulatory system vary tremendously both in their virulence and distribution worldwide. Some of these pathogens are practically global in their distribution. Fortunately, the most ubiquitous viruses tend to produce the mildest forms of disease. In the majority of cases, those infected remain asymptomatic. On the other hand, other viruses are associated with life-threatening diseases that have impacted human history.
    • 23.6: Anatomy of the Nervous System
      The human nervous system can be divided into two interacting subsystems: the peripheral nervous system (PNS) and the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS consists of the brain and spinal cord. The peripheral nervous system is an extensive network of nerves connecting the CNS to the muscles and sensory structures.