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9.1: Introduction

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    40966
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    After a genome has been sequenced, a common next step is to attempt to infer the functional potential of the organism or cell encoded through careful analysis of that sequence. This mainly takes the form of identifying the protein coding genes within the sequence as they are thought to be the primary units of function within living systems; this is not to say that they are the only functional units within genomes as things such as regulatory motifs and non-coding RNAs are also imperative elements.

    This annotation of the protein coding regions is too laborious to do by hand, so it is automated in a process known as computational gene identification. The algorithms underlying this process are often based on Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), a concept discussed in previous chapters to solve simple problems such as knowing whether a casino is rolling a fair versus a loaded die. Genomes, however, are very complicated sets of data, replete with long repeats, overlapping genes (where one or more nucleotides are part of two or more distinct genes) and pseudogenes (non-transcribed regions that look very similar to genes) among many other obfuscations. Thus, experimental and evolutionary data often needs to be included into HMMs for greater annotational accuracy, which can result in a loss of scalability or a reliance on incorrect assumptions of independence. Alternative algorithms have been utilized to address the problems of HMMs including those based on Conditional Random Fields (CRFs), which rely on creating a distribution of the hidden states of the genomic sequence in question conditioned on known data. Use of CRFs has not phased out HMMs as both are used with varying degrees of success in practice.1


    1R. Guigo (1997). “Computational gene identification: an open problem.” Computers Chem. Vol. 21. 165


    This page titled 9.1: Introduction is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Manolis Kellis et al. (MIT OpenCourseWare) via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.