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10: Putting It All Together

  • Page ID
    2931
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    With this chapter, we tie up a bunch of loose ends and ponder what lies in the future of biochemistry.

    • 10.1: Looking Back
      Thousands of enzymes and their substrates have been identified, and hundreds of metabolic pathways traced. The structure of hundreds of proteins is known down to the position of every atom. Following the elucidation of the structure of DNA in 1953, scientists have discovered a dizzying number of facts about how information is stored, used and inherited in cells. Cloned and transgenic animals and gene therapy were a reality in less than 50 years. And the discoveries still keep coming.
    • 10.2: Looking Forward
      Toward the end of the twentieth century, new methods began to change the face of biochemistry. The launching of the Human Genome Project and the development of faster and cheaper sequencing technologies provided biochemists with entire genome sequences, not only of humans, but of numerous other organisms. Huge databases were set up to deal with the volume of sequence information generated by the various genome projects. Computer programs cataloged and analyzed these sequences.

    Dr. Kevin Ahern and Dr. Indira Rajagopal (Oregon State University)


    This page titled 10: Putting It All Together is shared under a CC BY-NC-SA 4.0 license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by Kevin Ahern & Indira Rajagopal via source content that was edited to the style and standards of the LibreTexts platform; a detailed edit history is available upon request.