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Biology LibreTexts

9.4: Gel Exclusion Chromatography

Gel exclusion chromatography (also called molecular exclusion chromatography, size exclusion chromatography, or gel filtration chromatography) is a low resolution isolation method that employs a cool “trick." This involves the use of beads that have tiny “tunnels" in them that each have a precise size. The size is referred to as an “exclusion limit," which means that molecules above a certain molecular weight will not fit into the tunnels. Molecules with sizes larger than the exclusion limit do not enter the tunnels and pass through the column relatively quickly by making their way between the beads. Smaller molecules, which can enter the tunnels, do so, and thus, have a longer path that they take in passing through the column. Because of this, molecules larger than the exclusion limit will leave the column earlier, while those that pass through the beads will elute from the column later. This method allows separation of molecules by their size.

Figure 9.4.1: Gel Exclusion Chromatography

Contributors

Dr. Kevin Ahern and Dr. Indira Rajagopal (Oregon State University)