Skip to main content
Biology LibreTexts

12.18: Putting It Together- Theory of Evolution

  • Page ID
    44474
  • \( \newcommand{\vecs}[1]{\overset { \scriptstyle \rightharpoonup} {\mathbf{#1}} } \)

    \( \newcommand{\vecd}[1]{\overset{-\!-\!\rightharpoonup}{\vphantom{a}\smash {#1}}} \)

    \( \newcommand{\id}{\mathrm{id}}\) \( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\)

    ( \newcommand{\kernel}{\mathrm{null}\,}\) \( \newcommand{\range}{\mathrm{range}\,}\)

    \( \newcommand{\RealPart}{\mathrm{Re}}\) \( \newcommand{\ImaginaryPart}{\mathrm{Im}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\Argument}{\mathrm{Arg}}\) \( \newcommand{\norm}[1]{\| #1 \|}\)

    \( \newcommand{\inner}[2]{\langle #1, #2 \rangle}\)

    \( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\id}{\mathrm{id}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\kernel}{\mathrm{null}\,}\)

    \( \newcommand{\range}{\mathrm{range}\,}\)

    \( \newcommand{\RealPart}{\mathrm{Re}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\ImaginaryPart}{\mathrm{Im}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\Argument}{\mathrm{Arg}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\norm}[1]{\| #1 \|}\)

    \( \newcommand{\inner}[2]{\langle #1, #2 \rangle}\)

    \( \newcommand{\Span}{\mathrm{span}}\) \( \newcommand{\AA}{\unicode[.8,0]{x212B}}\)

    \( \newcommand{\vectorA}[1]{\vec{#1}}      % arrow\)

    \( \newcommand{\vectorAt}[1]{\vec{\text{#1}}}      % arrow\)

    \( \newcommand{\vectorB}[1]{\overset { \scriptstyle \rightharpoonup} {\mathbf{#1}} } \)

    \( \newcommand{\vectorC}[1]{\textbf{#1}} \)

    \( \newcommand{\vectorD}[1]{\overrightarrow{#1}} \)

    \( \newcommand{\vectorDt}[1]{\overrightarrow{\text{#1}}} \)

    \( \newcommand{\vectE}[1]{\overset{-\!-\!\rightharpoonup}{\vphantom{a}\smash{\mathbf {#1}}}} \)

    \( \newcommand{\vecs}[1]{\overset { \scriptstyle \rightharpoonup} {\mathbf{#1}} } \)

    \( \newcommand{\vecd}[1]{\overset{-\!-\!\rightharpoonup}{\vphantom{a}\smash {#1}}} \)

    Let’s return to our discussion of evolving bacteria from the beginning of the chapter. The World Health Organization (WHO) suggests that based on current evidence, gonorrhea may soon be untreatable; there are no new treatments or vaccinations in development for this bacteria. Within the United States this remain the second most common sexually transmitted disease. Almost a third of the US cases are drug resistant. MRSA remains a growing problem in our healthcare system. Staph bacteria are the most common source of health-care related infections in the United States. Of MRSA infections, nearly 14% result in death.

    Think about It

    Based on this lesson you now understand that evolution is an inevitable process. Is there any hope of stopping antibiotic resistance from developing?

    [practice-area rows=”4″][/practice-area]
    [reveal-answer q=”880848″]See Our Thoughts[/reveal-answer]
    [hidden-answer a=”880848″]Yes and no. The average person can take a number of steps to minimize selective pressures on parasites. Without these pressures, mutations are less likely to spread in the population.

    [/hidden-answer]

    Is there anything you can do?

    [practice-area rows=”4″][/practice-area]
    [reveal-answer q=”558353″]See Our Thoughts[/reveal-answer]
    [hidden-answer a=”558353″]

    • Take the full course of prescribed antibiotics
    • Don’t save or share leftover antibiotics
    • Don’t ask for antibiotics if your doctor does not recommend them
    • Practice good hygiene and get recommended vaccinations
    • Minimize your use of antibacterial products

    [/hidden-answer]

    To learn more about the topic, you can visit the following websites:

    Contributors and Attributions

    CC licensed content, Original
    • Authored by: Shelli Carter and Lumen Learning. Provided by: Lumen Learning. License: CC BY: Attribution

    12.18: Putting It Together- Theory of Evolution is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

    • Was this article helpful?