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10.8: Introduction to Plant Functionality

  • Page ID
    44665
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    What you’ll learn to do: Discuss common functions of plants

    You may have heard the common phrase “form follows function”; this phrase simply means that the form of anything is created or designed (or evolved!) to allow the function that thing needs. As we’ve learned previously, plants share several common structures: stems, roots, and leaves. As you may have guessed, these common structures allow for the common functions of plants.

    All plants transport water, minerals, and sugars produced through photosynthesis through the plant body in a similar manner. All plant species also respond to environmental factors, such as light, gravity, competition, temperature, and predation.


    10.8: Introduction to Plant Functionality is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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