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20.22: Putting It Together- The Sensory System

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    44187
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    These videos walk you through the way we experience our major special senses. It all boils down to one thing: sensory cells translating chemical, electromagnetic, and mechanical stimuli into action potentials that our nervous system can make sense of.

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    Career Connection

    There are different professions that focus on human senses. Most likely, the profession you’re most familiar with in this category is optometrists (eye doctors).

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    Optometrists examine the eyes and other parts of the visual system. They also diagnose and treat visual problems and manage diseases, injuries, and other disorders of the eyes. They prescribe eyeglasses or contact lenses as needed.

    Some optometrists spend much of their time providing specialized care, particularly if they are working in a group practice with other optometrists or physicians. For example, some optometrists mostly treat patients with only partial sight, a condition known as low vision. Others may focus on treating infants and children.

    Optometrists promote eye health and counsel patients on how general health can affect eyesight. For example, they may counsel patients on how smoking cessation or weight loss can reduce vision problems.

    Many optometrists own their practice and those who do may spend more time on general business activities, such as hiring employees, ordering supplies, and marketing their business.

    Optometrists should not be confused with ophthalmologists or dispensing opticians. Ophthalmologists are physicians who perform eye surgery and treat eye diseases in addition to performing eye exams and prescribing eyeglasses and contact lenses. For more information on ophthalmologists, see the physicians and surgeons profile. Dispensing opticians fit and adjust eyeglasses and, in some states, fill contact lens prescriptions that an optometrist or ophthalmologist has written.

    There are also audiologists, who diagnose, manage, and treat a patient’s hearing, balance, or ear problems.

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    Audiologists use audiometers, computers, and other devices to test patients’ hearing ability and balance. They work to determine the extent of hearing damage and identify the underlying cause. Audiologists measure the loudness at which a person begins to hear sounds and the person’s ability to distinguish between sounds and understand speech.

    Before determining treatment options, audiologists evaluate psychological information to measure the impact of hearing loss on a patient. Treatment may include cleaning wax out of ear canals, fitting and checking hearing aids, or fitting the patient with cochlear implants to improve hearing. Cochlear implants are tiny devices that are placed under the skin near the ear and deliver electrical impulses directly to the auditory nerve in the brain. This allows a person with certain types of deafness to be able to hear.

    Audiologists also counsel patients on other ways to cope with profound hearing loss, such as by learning to lip read or by using technology.

    Audiologists can help a patient suffering from vertigo or other balance problems. They work with patients and provide them with exercises involving head movement or positioning that might relieve some of their symptoms.

    Some audiologists specialize in working with the elderly or with children. Others educate the public on hearing loss prevention. Audiologists may design products to help protect the hearing of workers on the job. Audiologists who are self-employed hire employees, keep records, order equipment and supplies, and complete other tasks related to running a business.

    Contributors and Attributions

    All rights reserved content
    • Taste & Smell: Crash Course A&P #16. Authored by: CrashCourse. Located at: https://youtu.be/mFm3yA1nslE. License: All Rights Reserved. License Terms: Standard YouTube license
    • Hearing & Balance: Crash Course A&P #17. Authored by: CrashCourse. Located at: https://youtu.be/Ie2j7GpC4JU. License: All Rights Reserved. License Terms: Standard YouTube license
    Public domain content

    20.22: Putting It Together- The Sensory System is shared under a not declared license and was authored, remixed, and/or curated by LibreTexts.

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