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Biology LibreTexts

12.2F: Neutralization Reaction

  • Page ID
    11828
  • Neutralization reactions are used to inactivate viruses and evaluate neutralizing antibodies.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    Describe how neutralizing antibodies serve to block viral attachment to cells thus inhibiting viral replication

    KEY TAKEAWAYS

    Key Points

    • When a vertebrate is infected with a virus, antibodies are produced against it. Some of the antibodies can block viral infection by neutralization which is usually the result of a formation of a virus-antibody complex. This complex can prevent viral infections in many ways.
    • Neutralizing antibodies have shown potential in the treatment of retroviral infections such as HIV. Recently, potent and broadly neutralizing human antibodies against influenza have been reported.
    • In diagnostic immunology and virology laboratories, the evaluation of neutralizing antibodies, which destroy the infectivity of viruses, can be measured by the neutralization method.

    Key Terms

    • neutralization: In the immunological sense refers to the ability of antibodies to block the site(s) on bacteria or viruses that they use to enter their target cell. One example of this within biology is a neutralizing antibody.
    • virion: A single individual particle of a virus (the viral equivalent of a cell).
    • endosomes: membrane-bound compartments inside eukaryotic cells.

    A neutralizing antibody defends a cell from an antigen or infectious body by inhibiting or neutralizing any effect it has biologically. The antibody response is crucial for preventing many viral infections and may also contribute to the resolution of an infection. When a vertebrate is infected with a virus, antibodies are produced against many epitopes of multiple virus proteins. A subset of these antibodies can block viral infection by a process called neutralization. This usually involves the formation of a virus-antibody complex.

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    Neutralizing antibody: Antibody neutralizing an antigen and preventing its biological effect.

    This virus-antibody complex can prevent viral infections in many ways. It may interfere with virion binding to receptors, block uptake into cells, prevent uncoating of the genomes in endosomes, or cause aggregation of virus particles. Many enveloped viruses are lysed when antiviral antibodies and serum complement disrupt membranes. Antibodies can also neutralize viral infectivity by binding to cell surface receptors.

    Neutralizing antibodies have shown potential in the treatment of retroviral infections. Medical professionals and researchers have shown how the encoding of genes which influence the production of this particular type of antibody could help in the treatment of infections that attack the immune system. Experts in the field have used HIV treatment as an example of infections these antibodies can treat. Recently, potent and broadly neutralizing human antibodies against influenza have been reported, and have suggested possible strategies to generate an improved vaccine that would confer long-lasting immunity. Another disease which has been linked to the production of neutralizing antibodies is multiple sclerosis.

    In diagnostic immunology and virology laboratories, the evaluation of neutralizing antibodies, which destroy the infectivity of viruses, can be measured by the neutralization method. In this procedure, patient serum is mixed with a suspension of infectious virus particles of the same type as those suspected of causing disease in the patient. A control suspension of virus is mixed with normal serum and is then inoculated into an appropriate cell culture. If the patient serum contains antibody to the virus, the antibody will bind to the virus particles and prevent them from invading the cells in culture, thereby neutralizing the infectivity of the virus. This technique is labor-intensive, demanding, and time consuming. It application is restricted to laboratories that perform routine viral cultures and related diagnosis.