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Biology LibreTexts

17.1F: Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs)

  • Page ID
    13342
  • Transgenic modification, adding recombinant DNA to a species, has led to the expression of desirable genes in plants and animals.

    Learning Objectives

    • Describe how research on transgenic plants and animals aids humans.

    Key Points

    • Transgenic animals are those that have been modified to express recombinant DNA from another species.
    • Manipulation of transgenic plants, those that have received recombinant DNA from other species, has led to the creation of species that display disease resistance, herbicide and pesticide resistance, better nutritional value, and better shelf-life.
    • The thickness of a plant’s cell wall makes the artificial introduction of DNA into plant cells much more challenging than in animal cells.

    Key Terms

    • transgenic: of or pertaining to an organism whose genome has been changed by the addition of a gene from another species; genetically modified
    • genetically modified organism: an organism whose genetic material has been altered using genetic engineering techniques

    Transgenic Animals

    Although several recombinant proteins used in medicine are successfully produced in bacteria, some proteins require a eukaryotic animal host for proper processing. For this reason, the desired genes are cloned and expressed in animals, such as sheep, goats, chickens, and mice. Animals that have been modified to express recombinant DNA are called transgenic animals. Several human proteins are expressed in the milk of transgenic sheep and goats, while others are expressed in the eggs of chickens. Mice have been used extensively for expressing and studying the effects of recombinant genes and mutations.

    Transgenic Plants

    Manipulating the DNA of plants (or creating genetically modified organisms called GMOs) has helped to create desirable traits, such as disease resistance, herbicide and pesticide resistance, better nutritional value, and better shelf-life. Plants are the most important source of food for the human population. Farmers developed ways to select for plant varieties with desirable traits long before modern-day biotechnology practices were established. Plants that have received recombinant DNA from other species are called transgenic plants. Because foreign genes can spread to other species in the environment, extensive testing is required to ensure ecological stability. Staples like corn, potatoes, and tomatoes were the first crop plants to be genetically engineered.

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    Transgenic Plants: Corn, a major agricultural crop used to create products for a variety of industries, is often modified through plant biotechnology.

    Transformation of Plants Using Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    Gene transfer occurs naturally between species in microbial populations. Many viruses that cause human diseases, such as cancer, act by incorporating their DNA into the human genome. In plants, tumors caused by the bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens occur by transfer of DNA from the bacterium to the plant. Although the tumors do not kill the plants, they stunt the plants, which become more susceptible to harsh environmental conditions. Many plants, such as walnuts, grapes, nut trees, and beets, are affected by A. tumefaciens. The artificial introduction of DNA into plant cells is more challenging than in animal cells because of the thick plant cell wall.

    Researchers used the natural transfer of DNA from Agrobacterium to a plant host to introduce DNA fragments of their choice into plant hosts. In nature, the disease-causing A. tumefaciens have a set of plasmids, called the Ti plasmids (tumor-inducing plasmids), that contain genes for the production of tumors in plants. DNA from the Ti plasmid integrates into the infected plant cell’s genome. Researchers manipulate the Ti plasmids to remove the tumor-causing genes and insert the desired DNA fragment for transfer into the plant genome. The Ti plasmids carry antibiotic resistance genes to aid selection and can be propagated in E. coli cells as well.

    The Organic Insecticide Bacillus thuringiensis

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is a bacterium that produces protein crystals during sporulation that are toxic to many insect species that affect plants. Bt toxin has to be ingested by insects for the toxin to be activated. Insects that have eaten Bt toxin stop feeding on the plants within a few hours. After the toxin is activated in the intestines of the insects, death occurs within a couple of days. Modern biotechnology has allowed plants to encode their own crystal Bt toxin that acts against insects. The crystal toxin genes have been cloned from Bt and introduced into plants. Bt toxin has been found to be safe for the environment, non-toxic to humans and other mammals, and is approved for use by organic farmers as a natural insecticide.

    Flavr Savr Tomato

    The first GM crop to be introduced into the market was the Flavr Savr Tomato, produced in 1994. Antisense RNA technology was used to slow down the process of softening and rotting caused by fungal infections, which led to increased shelf life of the GM tomatoes. Additional genetic modification improved the flavor of this tomato. The Flavr Savr tomato did not successfully stay in the market because of problems maintaining and shipping the crop.

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    The Flavr Savr Tomato: Plant physiologist Athanasios Theologis with tomatoes that contain the bioengineered ACC synthase gene (the Flavr Savr Tomato).